THE PODCAST

aaron aiken :: 2.4

Jonathan Blundell —  January 22, 2009 — 25 Comments

aaron and lindsay

this week we chat with aaron aiken and discuss ideas on how we can rethink our finances to live simpler, be a better steward of your money and break the bondage of debt. aaron and his wife lindsay, run the where you are now website which features a blog, videos and a weekly podcast all focused on helping people make better decisions related to their money and finances.

from the site ::

Where You Are Now is a personal finance website with principles that can apply to your finances no matter where you are now in your life. Its articles will be easy to understand and simple at the heart because we are not financial guru’s or professional advisers, we are just like you; people learning how to better manage our money as we live life. So, wherever you are now (high school, college, married with kids) we hope that the information you find here is helpful and enlightening.

so listen in and then take a few seconds to leave a story about what you’re doing to rethink your finances either in the comments section below or by calling our listener line :: 972.535.8980.

related ::
where you are now
aaron on twitter
lindsay on twitter
red box
hulu
thomas post surgery – with his iPhone
thomas post surgery – asleep with his iPhone

additional financial resources ::
crown financial
dave ramsey
payplan
national debt line – scotland
national debt line – England/Wales

music ::
gurdonark – hope
gurdonark – prudence
zehnder – justice jam ©2008 Tim Gibbs Zehnder, Tom Zehnder, Chris Henrikson, Keith Jones and Chenjerai Kumanyika
herbaliser – you’re not all that

My Podcast Alley feed! {pca-3fa7b51cdba77eceaa0ded9e0d563bc2}

Jonathan Blundell

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I'm a husband, father, blogger, podcaster, author and media geek who is hoping to live a simple life and follow The Way. How can I help you tell your story?

25 responses to aaron aiken :: 2.4

  1. New blog post: something beautiful :: 2.4 :: aaron aiken http://tinyurl.com/bd5dgu

  2. RT: @sbpodcast: something beautiful :: 2.4 :: rethink your finances with aaron aiken http://tinyurl.com/bd5dgu

  3. RT @sbpodcast New blog post: something beautiful :: 2.4 :: aaron aiken http://tinyurl.com/bd5dgu

  4. Retweeting @sbpodcast: New blog post: something beautiful :: 2.4 :: aaron aiken http://tinyurl.com/bd5dgu

  5. RT @sbpodcast: New blog post: something beautiful :: 2.4 :: aaron aiken http://tinyurl.com/bd5dgu

  6. RT @jdblundell: RT: @sbpodcast: something beautiful :: 2.4 :: rethink your finances with aaron aiken http://tinyurl.com/bd5dgu

  7. This podcast provides a good discussion of a timely topic. Rather than taking the now-fashionable “pray and you will be rich” view of material prosperity, your guests instead promote thrift, common-sense, and self-education.

    I have a dear friend who chose never to get education past high school, and who has worked in progressively more responsible but ultimately not high-income jobs for a long and satisfying career. Yet he’s never faced the challenges that people who make a multiple of his income face. What is his secret? Thrift. Common sense. He lives in a modest but very nice rental, he avoids long-term credit card debt like the plague (using cards only a conveniences to be paid off each month), and he chooses pleasures which are affordable and easily manageable within his means. He saves, maintaining a short-term reserve and investing long term for retirement.

    I knew of another couple once, both highly educated professionals, who lived in a home that might have been from the Great Gatsby. They were bright, capable people–but when an economic set-back beset them, their safety net was not just frayed, but missing. I learned a confirmation of an important lesson from their misfortune–one should always live within–and if possible, below, one’s means.

    I agree with the comments in the podcast that it is the “love of money” that is the root of all evil rather than money itself–and it is possible to imagine an idolatry of miserly living.
    Yet the idea that it is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the Kingdom of Heaven illustrates a lesson about how we live with money.

    I work as a commercial litigation attorney, who has represented both debtors and creditors. One thing that strikes me, always, is when I meet someone who has been defrauded into making an unwise investment. So often the investment promoter seeks to appeal to a shared religious heritage–and public prayer with relative strangers perhaps occurs no place more often than among senior citizens being asked to pray with those who wish to defraud them of their money.

    This podcast helps avoid “ceding the field” to those who view religion as the ultimate “get acquainted and get rich” scheme. People of faith and good will share a common goal in material life–to live so as to enable ourselves to pursue
    our individual callings. We forget what a precious gift we have in lands of plenty to pursue these goals. When we view money as one part of our integrated lives–lives we wish to live with meaning, according to a Purpose–then we cannot afford to leave money matters to “wiser minds”, whether on Wall Street or elsewhere.

    I love the charity Kiva, a micro-lending charity. One lends 25 dollars to help fund a loan made by many to a third world business owner. A loan of as little as five hundred dollars can make such a difference. We forget how in 3/4 of the world, avoidance of want is not possible. In our 1/4 of the world, striking a balance should be not only a hope, but a reality.

    I liked very much the frank, down-to-earth approach of your guests, and the discussion altogether. Thank you, also, for including my music here, as I release music for just such purposes.

    In addition to Hulu, I suggest that the creative commons music culture gives one the chance to obtain free music to download, whether from jamendo.com, any of hundreds of netlabels, from ccmixter.org or elsewhere, as but the tip of an iceberg of creative sharing now being pursued by those who think that making money has ruled the arts a wee bit long.

    Such a long comment–perhaps I should close and say “great show!”.

  8. This podcast provides a good discussion of a timely topic. Rather than taking the now-fashionable “pray and you will be rich” view of material prosperity, your guests instead promote thrift, common-sense, and self-education.

    I have a dear friend who chose never to get education past high school, and who has worked in progressively more responsible but ultimately not high-income jobs for a long and satisfying career. Yet he’s never faced the challenges that people who make a multiple of his income face. What is his secret? Thrift. Common sense. He lives in a modest but very nice rental, he avoids long-term credit card debt like the plague (using cards only a conveniences to be paid off each month), and he chooses pleasures which are affordable and easily manageable within his means. He saves, maintaining a short-term reserve and investing long term for retirement.

    I knew of another couple once, both highly educated professionals, who lived in a home that might have been from the Great Gatsby. They were bright, capable people–but when an economic set-back beset them, their safety net was not just frayed, but missing. I learned a confirmation of an important lesson from their misfortune–one should always live within–and if possible, below, one’s means.

    I agree with the comments in the podcast that it is the “love of money” that is the root of all evil rather than money itself–and it is possible to imagine an idolatry of miserly living.
    Yet the idea that it is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the Kingdom of Heaven illustrates a lesson about how we live with money.

    I work as a commercial litigation attorney, who has represented both debtors and creditors. One thing that strikes me, always, is when I meet someone who has been defrauded into making an unwise investment. So often the investment promoter seeks to appeal to a shared religious heritage–and public prayer with relative strangers perhaps occurs no place more often than among senior citizens being asked to pray with those who wish to defraud them of their money.

    This podcast helps avoid “ceding the field” to those who view religion as the ultimate “get acquainted and get rich” scheme. People of faith and good will share a common goal in material life–to live so as to enable ourselves to pursue
    our individual callings. We forget what a precious gift we have in lands of plenty to pursue these goals. When we view money as one part of our integrated lives–lives we wish to live with meaning, according to a Purpose–then we cannot afford to leave money matters to “wiser minds”, whether on Wall Street or elsewhere.

    I love the charity Kiva, a micro-lending charity. One lends 25 dollars to help fund a loan made by many to a third world business owner. A loan of as little as five hundred dollars can make such a difference. We forget how in 3/4 of the world, avoidance of want is not possible. In our 1/4 of the world, striking a balance should be not only a hope, but a reality.

    I liked very much the frank, down-to-earth approach of your guests, and the discussion altogether. Thank you, also, for including my music here, as I release music for just such purposes.

    In addition to Hulu, I suggest that the creative commons music culture gives one the chance to obtain free music to download, whether from jamendo.com, any of hundreds of netlabels, from ccmixter.org or elsewhere, as but the tip of an iceberg of creative sharing now being pursued by those who think that making money has ruled the arts a wee bit long.

    Such a long comment–perhaps I should close and say “great show!”.

  9. My song “Prudence” used in a podcast about thrift:: http://tinyurl.com/bd5dgu

  10. RT @Gurdonark: My song “Prudence” used in a podcast about thrift:: http://tinyurl.com/bd5dgu > it works so well! Big ups @jdblundell… Tx

  11. RT @Gurdonark: My song “Prudence” used in a podcast about thrift:: http://tinyurl.com/bd5dgu > it works so we.. http://tinyurl.com/a9lpl2

  12. gurdonark,
    thanks again for taking the time to leave a great comment – and for letting us use your tracks. look forward to featuring more in the future.

  13. gurdonark,
    thanks again for taking the time to leave a great comment – and for letting us use your tracks. look forward to featuring more in the future.

  14. Thanks for a good post – this is a really good website actually.

Trackbacks and Pingbacks:

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